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Twelve Days in May

Freedom Ride 1961
eBook
A Robert F. Sibert Informational Book Award Winner
On May 4, 1961, a group of thirteen black and white civil rights activists launched the Freedom Ride, aiming to challenge the practice of segregation on buses and at bus terminal facilities in the South. The Ride would last twelve days. Despite the fact that segregation on buses crossing state lines was ruled unconstitutional by the Supreme Court in 1946, and segregation in interstate transportation facilities was ruled unconstitutional in 1960, these rulings were routinely ignored in the South. The thirteen Freedom Riders intended to test the laws and draw attention to the lack of enforcement with their peaceful protest. As the Riders traveled deeper into the South, they encountered increasing violence and opposition. Noted civil rights author Larry Dane Brimner relies on archival documents and rarely seen images to tell the riveting story of the little-known first days of the Freedom Ride. With author’s note, source notes, bibliography, and index.

Expand title description text
Publisher: Boyds Mills Press
Awards:

Kindle Book

  • Release date: November 7, 2017

OverDrive Read

  • ISBN: 9781629799179
  • File size: 6281 KB
  • Release date: November 7, 2017

EPUB eBook

  • ISBN: 9781629799179
  • File size: 6400 KB
  • Release date: November 7, 2017

Formats

Kindle Book
OverDrive Read
EPUB eBook

Languages

English

Levels

Lexile® Measure:1080
Text Difficulty:7-9

A Robert F. Sibert Informational Book Award Winner
On May 4, 1961, a group of thirteen black and white civil rights activists launched the Freedom Ride, aiming to challenge the practice of segregation on buses and at bus terminal facilities in the South. The Ride would last twelve days. Despite the fact that segregation on buses crossing state lines was ruled unconstitutional by the Supreme Court in 1946, and segregation in interstate transportation facilities was ruled unconstitutional in 1960, these rulings were routinely ignored in the South. The thirteen Freedom Riders intended to test the laws and draw attention to the lack of enforcement with their peaceful protest. As the Riders traveled deeper into the South, they encountered increasing violence and opposition. Noted civil rights author Larry Dane Brimner relies on archival documents and rarely seen images to tell the riveting story of the little-known first days of the Freedom Ride. With author’s note, source notes, bibliography, and index.

Expand title description text